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Civil servants protest failed housing scheme

Subscribers to the NLC/TUC Good Homes scheme have appealed to authorities concerned to allocate land for them to address their housing challenges.

They made the appeal when they took peaceful protests to the minister of the FCT, Mallam Mohammed Bello and the Nigeria Labour Congress, NLC headquarters in Abuja.

This follows other protests by the group, staged at the FCDA secretariat which did not receive attention.

This time, the aggrieved subscribers took their protest to the residence of the minister of the FCT in an attempt to get his attention by all means.

According to the Chairman of the Housing Scheme Subscribers Association, Chief Emeka Ananu, who led the chanting members, after about ten years of committing resources to the housing project, neither houses nor lands have been allocated to them.

Chief Ananu claimed that over one billion naira had been committed to the housing scheme by some civil servants without them getting houses or lands as expected.

The scheme was inaugurated in 2014 with the aim of making civil servants own their houses in Lafiya, Apo area of the FCT.

The subscribers displayed placards bearing various inscriptions during the protest, demanding justice.

Some of them claimed they have been servicing the loans they obtained to key onto the housing scheme without any respite, a situation they decried was affecting their economic, healthy and social well-being.

They said some of their members have died during the struggle while others have retired after attaining sixty years or 35 years in service without houses of their own.

No one came to address the protesters at both place of protest.

At the minister’s residence, they were confronted by some security personnel attached to the minister.

At the Labour House, the protesters sang solidarity songs, displayed their placards, and called on the NLC leadership to come and address them but to no avail.

They left both places with a promise to return at a later date until their demand for getting their houses or lands is met.

Reporting by Tersoo Zamber, editing by Daniel Adejo